Friday, June 16, 2006

---- HAZARD NOTES ----

Submitted by Anonymous:
_____________________________

Doug,

I can't believe what I just saw. In one of the buildings near where I work there is a water fountain. There is now a bright orange sticker on the fountain that says:

---- HAZARD NOTES ----

-Tap Water-

-No Physical Hazard Known
-May not be suitable for intended use. Check with Supervisor


Seriously? I can see for other things, but a water fountain? Perhaps I
should check with my mentor before taking a drink.

Just something to bring a little cynical humor to the blog on a Friday.
Maybe someone could get a picture of one of these...


Comments:
Tear it off. Throw it in the trash. Like other nonsensical signs, it will never reappear.
 
Now hold on here. Perhaps our training from the past two years hasn't yet sunk in with everyone. The sign is indeed accurate. What if the alleged "water" actually contains some gawdawfuldeadly element such as ARSENIC or maybe even SODIUM in concentrations as high as the ppm level? If THAT happened, I'll bet you'd feel pretty stupid that you didn't check with your supervisor. Think of the rest of the Children... And besides, it MAY NOT be suitable for its intended use. What if you intended to use it to power your car? Or to get drunk? Let's give this danger a wide berth boys and girls. Things are not always what they may appear to be. Check with your supervisor, or better still, the Director. At LANL, its better to pass out from dehydration rather than assume what might be in your so called "tap water".
 
"Things are not always what they may appear to be".


I remember many tears ago when signs appeared on the walls above the bathroom toilets warning that they may contain hazardous materials.
 
It sounds like a few people need to repeat their safety training until they learn to take dihydrogen monoxide threats seriously.
 
Was there ever a DOE study on the feasibilty of storing the water dehydrated? Wouldn't solar powered dehydrated water storage tanks be a cheaper and more reliable solution to this to this viscous safety threat?
 


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