Wednesday, December 14, 2005

Two serious explosive accidents have occurred at LANL in the last six months

This anonymous submission falls under the "rumor" category, as there is no way to verify its accuracy.
___________________________________________

Doug and Brad,
Attached is a contribution to the blog that I need to
submit as an anonymous contribution.
I am no longer associated with
the laboratory but have learned the information from
an HE scientist friend with first hand knowledge.

UC MANAGEMENT OF LANL LESSONS LEARNED FROM NANO'S SHUTDOWN

Two serious explosive accidents have occurred at LANL in
the last six months. Last Summer an explosive accident
occurred that blew out the walls of a building and injured
two technicians who now have permanent hearing loss.

In the last few days a piece of explosive was given to a
visitor which spontaneously burst into flames resulting in
second degree burns to his hands and body and the inhalation
of very toxic fumes by him and those in the vicinity.

So the UC management of LANL has learned how to increase
the rate of explosive accidents in the laboratory while
keeping the information out of the press.

Comments:
"This anonymous submission falls under the "rumor" category, as there is no way to verify its accuracy."

Would the poster or source consider providing some detail to this allegation?

I can't believe that an explosives accident would blow out the walls of a building and not be reported. It's hard to cover up that kind of evidence.

Larry Creamer
DX-1 Retired
 
The New Mexican
December 15, 2005

Lab worker hurt in experiment

A researcher received minor, second-degree burns on one hand after an experiment caught fire last week at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a lab spokeswoman said.

The scientist, whose name was withheld, was burned last Thursday, treated by a doctor and returned to work Friday, lab spokeswoman Kathy DeLucas said.

He was part of a group conducting an experiment with nano-aluminum and how it binds to fiberglass cloth, DeLucas said. The material “flashed” as researchers passed it among themselves , she said, and the researcher’s latexlike glove melted.
 
"Explosive Accidents ? ? ?" This is reassuring to many of us outside the LANL environment. Semi-hard evidence that may confirm that LANL is STILL involved with explosive devices and has not just degenerated into a bureaucratic mechanism to turn taxpayer dollars into pension plans for LANL employees.
 
The poster said:
"So the UC management of LANL has learned how to increase the rate of explosive accidents in the laboratory while keeping the information out of the press."

Well, the incidents made it to the Santa Fe New Mexican and radio station KSFR this morning and they sound a lot different than what was reported by the poster.

1. The building that blew up was destroyed as part of an experiment and no one was hurt during the test. I hope that statement is true. I also wish the PR folks had issued a press release at the time of the test.

2. The second report seems to be true except that nano-aluminum should not be called an explosive material. It is known that it will spontaneously combust when exposed to air. Fumes from burning aluminum are toxic, Nitrile gloves are inadequate for handling a combustible material. I hope this incident was properly reported.

Larry Creamer
DX-1 Retired
 
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