Los Alamos National Laboratory Director George P. Nanos shut down the entire laboratory in July, 2004, citing "egregious" security and safety violations at LANL as the reason. Seven months later, parts of the lab still had not restarted operations. The results of the shutdown include a cost to the taxpayer of approximately $850 million[1], an outward migration of highly talented staff members, and the loss of untold millions of dollars of funding from customers who have taken their business elsewhere. The managers of the LANL newspaper, "The NewsBulletin" began censoring letters to the editor shortly after the shutdown started. Nothing critical of LANL management was permitted to be published. As a result, that venue of discussion has all but dried up.  Surprisingly, the NewsBulletin recently decided to open up their forum somewhat starting in mid January, 2005.  A few submissions have made it to press without the imposed 6-week delay.  In the mean time, however, this blog was created.

On May 6, 2005 Director Nanos announced his resignation.

The purpose of this blog is to provide an uncensored forum where those concerned about the future of LANL may express their views. The focus is now on damage control: identifying problems at LANL and providing solutions to those problems.  A running list of activities that have been identified as counter-productive or wasteful is being maintained by contributers to this blog.  This list can be found under the Sidebar Link "Running List of Wasteful Activities at LANL", http://lanl-the-real-story.blogspot.com/2005/04/running-list-of-wasteful-activities-at.html

Post submissions should be emailed to lanlblog@parrot-farm.net. Please indicate if you wish the posting to be made anonymously.

This blog was produced and is maintained on my own time, using my own resources and those of blogger.com.


--Doug Roberts
lanlblog@parrot-farm.net


[1] There has not been an exact accounting of costs for the shutdown, nor is it likely that there will ever be.  The LANL Director's office estimated the shutdown cost at approximately $100 million in February, 2005,  NNSA estimated the cost at $367 million in March, 2005, and POGO (Project On Government Oversight) estimates the costs at $1 billion.